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dating medieval pottery

In fact at least two of them are Roman PRN The main products were jugs, bowls and jars. The distribution of this ware is uncertain at present, although recent excavations in nearby parishes have failed to produce any examples. Differences in style and fabric helps pottery specialists to identify vessels which are not of local manufacture. This website is constructed by enthusiastic amateurs. Kent shelly-sandy ware, abundant coarse sand West Kent fine sandy ware Ashford Potter's Corner sandy ware with fossil shell West Kent fine sandy with shell and sparse grits N. The diversity of styles can best be seen in a comparative study of apothecary jars produced between the 15th and 18th centuries.

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Goldthwaite notes [19] that Paride Berardi's morphology of Pesaro maioliche comprises four styles in 20 sub-groups; Tiziano Mannoni categorized Ligurian wares in four types, eight sub-categories and 36 further divisions; Galeazzo Cora's morphology of Montelupo's production is in 19 groups and 51 categories. Applied decoration, such as the shield in the picture, is a common feature of most glazed wares of this period. Forms produced included simple cooking pots and bowls, lamps and highly decorated 'urns' with incised lines and stamps in panels. However, in the Middle and Late Saxon period mid-7th to 11th centuries , many potteries were based in towns. Face jugs are the most common example of this, having a bearded face at the top, with arms and sometimes other anatomical parts on the body of the vessel. Kilns are divided into single, double and multi-flue types. Last update September

Most of the products which travelled some distance from the source, in north-west Norfolk, were green-glazed, but unglazed wares were also produced for local consumption. Grimston is best-known for its face jugs, a popular form in medieval Britain. These jugs were decorated with applied pellets and strips on the body, and applied bearded faces and arms on the neck and rim. Most are dated to the 13th and 14th centuries. Medieval Late 13thth centuries AD? Excavation of a pottery production site at Hollesley produced large quantities of glazed and unglazed wares.

TL dating of the kilns indicated a late 13th to 14th century date for the firing, although it is likely that the production period was longer. The main products were jugs, bowls and jars. Jugs were decorated with painted white slip lines and green glaze, and applied pellets, pads and other motifs were also used. The type is similar to Ipswich glazed ware below , which was being produced at the same time, and forms one of the most northerly examples of the southern East Anglian redware tradition.

Medieval 13thth centuries AD. Samples of this pottery type were collected from two kiln sites in Ipswich. It is a redware in the southern East Anglian tradition, with many sherds exhibiting signs of decoration with white slip.

It is very similar in appearance to Hollesley-type ware above , although microscopically the fabrics are different. Jugs appear to have been the most common product of these kilns, although some baggy jars with upright rims, and bowls with simple squared rims were also made. The distribution of this ware is uncertain at present, although recent excavations in nearby parishes have failed to produce any examples.

It may have served Ipswich but not the surrounding villages. Last update September Your email address will not be published. Findspot - Medieval pottery.

Description of this historic site. Map marker in the right place? If not, please correct the map. Objects and Finds Medieval - Comments Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page! Add a comment about this page Your email address will not be published.

They are located m south of Lodge Wood. Boundary ditch and posthole at Avonside, 1 High Street, Barford A boundary ditch and a post hole of medieval or post-medieval date were found in an evaulation trench in

Imsges: dating medieval pottery

dating medieval pottery

In the seventeenth century Savona began to be a prominent place of manufacture. From this time on, the history of European pottery became the story of European potters trying to steal or imitate the styles and secrets of Chinese porcelain or Islamic pottery.

dating medieval pottery

Boundary ditch and posthole at Avonside, 1 High Street, Barford A boundary ditch and a post hole of medieval or post-medieval date were found in an evaulation trench in

dating medieval pottery

Map marker in the right place? This was generally clear or brown-glazed redware in East Anglia, whilst other regions such as the north-west and the south datnig yellow and green-glazed whitewares. The causes of this are uncertain, but are possibly related to the collapse of urban industries and return to rural-based production, where wheels were never common. The dating medieval pottery products were jugs, bowls and jars. The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England. The same basic techniques were used and the same types dating medieval pottery vessel were produced in different areas, but the pottery has a regional character.