Suplex - Wikipedia

how do you hook up driving lights

Stickers help you be seen by cars, even during the day. This double grip is then used to hoist the opponent overhead in the belly-to-belly throw. Our sister site has everything we know about bicycle safety statistics. In a set-up similar to a tornado DDT , a wrestler goes to the top rope and applies a front facelock on their opponent from an elevated position, draping the opponent's near arm over their shoulder. Even if it's the other cyclist's fault for trying to pass you on the right when you make a right turn and have them slam into you, it won't hurt any less when they hit you. Just make sure when you do cross a street or driveway that you slow down considerably and that you check the traffic in all directions, especially behind you if you're riding with the flow of traffic.

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The Art of Urban Cycling The Urban Cycling Manual dismantles the urban cycling experience and slides it under the microscope, piece by piece. Let them know you're about to turn or move left or right by signalling with your arm. When that driver is looking down the road for traffic, he's not looking in the bike lane or the area closest to the curb; he's looking in the middle of the lane, for other cars. Give yourself enough room to brake if it turns. This move can be used to counter a kick. Don't hug the curb. It's required by law, anyway.

Either you're in front of the car and the car hits you, or the car pulls out in front of you and you slam into it. If you're riding at night, you absolutely should be using a front headlight.

It's required by law, anyway. Even for daytime riding, a bright white light that has a flashing mode can make you more visible to motorists who might otherwise Right Cross you. Look for the new LED headlights which last ten times as long on a set of batteries as old-style lights. And headlamps mounted on your head or helmet are the best, because then you can look directly at the driver to make sure they see your light.

If you can't make eye contact with the driver, wave your arm. It's easier for them to see your arm going left and right than it is for them to see a bicycle coming straight towards them. You could also use a loud horn like the Air Zound to get drivers' attention.

If it looks like the driver is about to pull out without seeing you, yell "Hey! Incidentally, many countries require bells on bicycles, but the U. If you can't make eye contact with the driver especially at night , slow down so much that you're able to completely stop if you have to.

Sure, it's inconvenient, but it beats getting hit. Doing this has saved my life on too many occasions to count. You're probably used to riding in the "A" line in the picture, very close to the curb, because you're worried about being hit from behind.

But take a look at the car. When that driver is looking down the road for traffic, he's not looking in the bike lane or the area closest to the curb; he's looking in the middle of the lane, for other cars. The farther left you are such as in "B" , the more likely the driver will see you. There's an added bonus here: In short, it gives you some options. Because if you stay all the way to the right and they pull out, your only "option" may be to run right into the driver's side door.

Using this method has saved me on three occasions in which a motorist ran into me slowly as they hit their brakes and I wasn't hurt, and in which I definitely would have slammed into the driver's side door had I not moved left. You might worry that moving left makes you more vulnerable to cars coming from behind. But the stats say you're far more likely to get hit by a car at an intersection ahead of you that can't see you, than from a car behind you which can see you clearly.

So while both positions have risk, you generally reduce your risk by riding a little farther left. Your actual lane position depends on road conditions.

On fast roadways with few cross streets and thus less chances to get hit at intersections , you'll ride farther to the right. On slow roads with many cross streets, you'll ride farther left. See lane position for more about this.

A driver opens his door right in front of you. You run right into it if you can't stop in time. This kind of crash is more common than you might think: It's the second-most common car-bike crash in Toronto, source and the 1 crash Santa Barbara. Ride to the left. Ride far enough to the left that you won't run into any door that's opened unexpectedly. You may be wary about riding so far into the lane that cars can't pass you easily, but you're more likely to get doored by a parked car if you ride too close to it than you are to get hit from behind by a car which can see you clearly.

If you're riding at night, a headlight is absolutely essential. It's required by law , anyway. Slow down enough that you're able to stop completely if necessary. Don't ride on the sidewalk in the first place. Crossing between sidewalks is a fairly dangerous maneuver.

If you do it on the left-hand side of the street, you risk getting slammed as per the diagram. If you do it on the right-hand side of the street, you risk getting slammed by a car behind you that's turning right.

Sidewalk riding also makes you vulnerable to cars pulling out of parking lots or driveways. And you're threatening to pedestrians on the sidewalk, who could get hurt if you hit them. These kinds of accidents are hard to avoid, which is a compelling reason to not ride on the sidewalk in the first place. In addition, riding on the sidewalk is illegal in some places.

Some special sidewalks are safe to ride on. If the sidewalk is really long no need to frequently cross streets , and free of driveways and peds, then there's little risk to you and others. Just make sure when you do cross a street or driveway that you slow down considerably and that you check the traffic in all directions, especially behind you if you're riding with the flow of traffic.

Even worse, you could be hit by a car on the same road coming at you from straight ahead of you. They had less time to see you and take evasive action because they're approaching you faster than normal because you're going towards them rather than away from them. Don't ride against traffic.

Ride with traffic, in the same direction. Riding against traffic may seem like a good idea because you can see the cars that are passing you, but it's not.

One study showed that riding the wrong way was three times as dangerous as riding the right way, and for kids, the risk is seven times greater. Nearly one-fourth of crashes involve cyclists riding the wrong way. That idea is just wrong. Second, the problem with wrong-way biking is that it promotes crashes, while right-way biking does not.

Don't stop in the blind spot. Simply stop behind a car, instead of to the right of it, as per the diagram below. This makes you very visible to traffic on all sides. It's impossible for the car behind you to avoid seeing you when you're right in front of it. Another option is to stop at either point A in the diagram above where the first driver can see you , or at point B, behind the first car so it can't turn into you, and far enough ahead of the second car so that the second driver can see you clearly.

It does no good to avoid stopping to the right of the first car if you're going to make the mistake of stopping to the right of the second car. If you chose spot A, then ride quickly to cross the street as soon as the light turns green. Don't look at the motorist to see if they want to go ahead and turn. If you're in spot A and they want to turn, then you're in their way.

Why did you take spot A if you weren't eager to cross the street when you could? When the light turns green, just go, and go quickly. But make sure cars aren't running the red light on the cross street, of course.

If you chose spot B, then when the light turns green, DON'T pass the car in front of you -- stay behind it, because it might turn right at any second. If it doesn't make a right turn right away, it may turn right into a driveway or parking lot unexpectedly at any point.

Don't count on drivers to signal! Assume that a car can turn right at any time. NEVER pass a car on the right! But try to stay ahead of the car behind you until you're through the intersection, because otherwise they might try to cut you off as they turn right.

While we're not advocating running red lights, notice it is in fact safer to run the red light if there's no cross traffic, than it is to wait legally at the red light directly to the right of a car, only to have it make a right turn right into you when the light turns green.

The moral here is not that you should break the law, but that you can easily get hurt even if you follow the law. By the way, be very careful when passing stopped cars on the right as you approach a red light. You run the risk of getting doored by a passenger exiting the car on the right side, or hit by a car that unexpectedly decides to pull into a parking space on the right side of the street. Don't ride on the sidewalk.

When you come off the sidewalk to cross the street you're invisible to motorists. You're just begging to be hit if you do this. Taking up the whole lane makes it harder for drivers to pass you to cut you off or turn into you. Don't feel bad about taking the lane: If the lane you're in isn't wide enough for cars to pass you safely, then you should be taking the whole lane anyway. Lane position is discussed in more detail below. Glance in your mirror before approaching an intersection.

If you don't have a handlebar or helmet mirror, get one now. Be sure to look in your mirror well before you get to the intersection. When you're actually going through an intersection, you'll need to be paying very close attention to what's in front of you.

Don't pass on the right. This collision is very easy to avoid. Just don't pass any vehicle on the right. If a car ahead of you is going only 10 mph, then you slow down, too, behind it. It will eventually start moving faster. If it doesn't, pass on the left when it's safe to do so. When passing cyclists on the left, announce "on your left" before you start passing, so they don't suddenly move left into you. Of course, they're much less likely to suddenly move left without looking, where they could be hit by traffic, then to suddenly move right, into a destination.

If they're riding too far to the left for you to pass safely on the left, then announce "on your right" before passing on the right. If several cars are stopped at a light, then you can try passing on the right cautiously. Remember that someone can fling open the passenger door unexpectedly as they exit the car. Also remember that if you pass on the right and traffic starts moving again unexpectedly, you may suffer 3, the Red Light of Death.

Note that when you're tailing a slow-moving vehicle, ride behind it, not in its blind spot immediately to the right of it. Even if you're not passing a car on the right, you could still run into it if it turns right while you're right next to it. Give yourself enough room to brake if it turns.

Look behind you before turning right. Here's your opportunity to avoid hitting cyclists who violate tip 1 above and try to pass you on the right. Look behind you before making a right-hand turn to make sure a bike isn't trying to pass you. Also remember that they could be coming up from behind you on the sidewalk while you're on the street. Even if it's the other cyclist's fault for trying to pass you on the right when you make a right turn and have them slam into you, it won't hurt any less when they hit you.

When you come off the sidewalk to cross the street, you're invisible to turning motorists. If you're riding at night, you should absolutely use a front headlight. It's required by law in most countries, anyway. Wear something bright, even during the day. It may seem silly, but bikes are small and easy to see through even during the day.

Yellow or orange reflective vests really make a big difference. Reflective leg bands are also easy and inexpensive. Don't overtake slow-moving vehicles on the right. Doing so makes you invisible to left-turning motorists at intersections. Passing on the right means that the vehicle you're passing could also make a right turn right into you, too. Never, ever move left without looking behind you first. Some motorists like to pass cyclists within mere inches, so moving even a tiny bit to the left unexpectedly could put you in the path of a car.

Practice holding a straight line while looking over your shoulder until you can do it perfectly. Most new cyclists tend to move left when they look behind them, which of course can be disastrous. Don't swerve in and out of the parking lane if it contains any parked cars. You might be tempted to ride in the parking lane where there are no parked cars, dipping back into the traffic lane when you encounter a parked car.

This puts you at risk for getting nailed from behind. Instead, ride a steady, straight line in the traffic lane. If you don't have one, get one from a bike shop or an online shop right now. There are models that fit on your handlebars, helmet, or glasses, as you prefer. You should always physically look back over your shoulder before moving left, but having a mirror still helps you monitor traffic without constantly having to look behind you.

Never move left without signaling. Just put your left arm straight out. Be sure to check your mirror or loo behind you before signaling since a car passing too closely can take your arm out. Get a rear light. If you're riding at night, you absolutely should use a flashing red rear light.

These kind of lights typically take two AA batteries, which last for months something like hours. I can't stress this item enough: If you ride at night, get a rear light! Wear a reflective vest or a safety triangle. High quality reflective gear makes you a lot more visible even in the day time, not just at night.

I had a friend ride away from me while wearing one during the day, and when she was about a quarter mile away, I couldn't see her or her bike at all, but the vest was clearly visible.

At night the difference is even greater. Also, when you hear a motorist approaching, straightening up into a vertical position will make your reflective gear more noticeable. Ride on streets whose outside lane is so wide that it can easily fit a car and a bike side by side. That way a car may zoom by you and avoid hitting you, even if they didn't see you! The slower a car is going, the more time the driver has to see you. I navigate the city by going through neighborhoods.

Learn how to do this. Use back streets on weekends. The risk of riding on Friday or Saturday night is much greater than riding on other nights because all the drunks are out driving around. If you do ride on a weekend night, make sure to take neighborhood streets rather than arterials. Get a mirror and use it. If it looks like a car doesn't see you, hop off your bike and onto the sidewalk. The suplex slam can also be used for other suplexes such as the fisherman suplex or gutwrech suplex.

Also called a suplex driver or a falcon arrow, this sees an attacker apply a front facelock to the opponent and drapes the opponent's near arm over their shoulder. The attacker then takes hold of the opponent's torso with their free arm and lifts the opponent to a vertical position.

The facelock is loosened so the opponent can be twisted slightly, then the attacker falls to a sitting position and the victim's back and shoulders are driven into the mat. The opponent lands between the attacker's legs with their head toward them. This move was innovated and popularized by Hayabusa , who named it Falcon Arrow.

The attacker then lifts the opponent into a vertical position, then he falls or kneels forward, driving the opponents face into the ground. The attacker then lifts the opponent into a vertical position, and falls into a sit-out position, driving the face of the opponent into the ground. In another variation, the wrestler releases the hold just prior to the sitout position letting his opponents own momentum to force them down head first.

Used by Dean Ambrose as signature move. A superplex a portmanteau of " super " and "suplex" refers to any suplex performed by an attacker standing on the second or third rope against an opponent sitting on the top rope or top turnbuckle. The most common suplex used for this top rope move is the standard vertical suplex variation known as the suicide-plex , in which the attackers apply a front face lock to the opponent, draping the opponent's near arm over their respective shoulders, at this point the wrestler falls backwards and flips the opponent over them so they both land on their backs.

In a set-up similar to a tornado DDT , a wrestler goes to the top rope and applies a front facelock on their opponent from an elevated position, draping the opponent's near arm over their shoulder. The wrestler then jumps forward and swings around, but lands on their feet and performs a suplex on their opponent.

In a set-up similar to a snap suplex, the attacking wrestler applies a front face lock to the opponent, draping the opponent's near arm over their shoulder, when the opponent is in position they are lifted to an upside-down position before the attacking wrestler falls backwards slamming the opponent's back into the mat.

This variation of a vertical suplex , also known as the hanging suplex, standing suplex or stalling suplex, sees the attacking wrestler holds an opponent in the upside-down position at the peak of the arc for several seconds before completing the maneuver, thereby in kayfabe causing blood to pool into the head of the opponent.

This move is a staple of larger and powerful wrestlers as it gives an aura of dominance over their opponents who can do nothing but wait to drop in the suplex. This variation of a vertical suplex sees the attacking wrestler lift the opponent as in a normal vertical suplex, but then simply drop them flat to the mat instead of falling backwards with them.

The move was first popularized in WCW by Kevin Nash , who began to use it instead of a standard suplex to avoid aggravating a back injury. This variation of a vertical suplex , also known as the Crash Landing , sees the attacker lift his opponent up with the standard suplex lift but instead of falling backwards and having the opponent drop down onto his shoulders and back, the attacker turns the opponent and releases them from the front facelock at the apex of the lift.

Both the attacker and the opponent fall forward, with the opponent landing on his neck, shoulders and back. Also known as triple rolling verticals, or triple rolling vertical suplexes, this variation of a vertical suplex sees the attacking wrestler perform a single vertical or snap suplex to the opponent, but the attacking wrestler doesn't release the hold, instead rolling his legs and body into a standing position to execute a second suplex, then repeats the process for a third suplex.

This variation was created and made popular by Chris Benoit , who called it a Hat Trick, a reference to Benoit's homeland, Canada, and the Canadian national sport of ice hockey and made even more popular by the late, great WWE Hall of Famer Eddie Guerrero , who called it the Three Amigos. The move has also been used by wrestlers such as Rey Mysterio Jr. This variation of a vertical suplex , also sometimes known as the rotation suplex, rotary suplex, or twisting suplex, it is also known in the WWE as the Final Cut performed by Goldust , sees the attacking wrestler lift the opponent as in a normal vertical suplex, but turn around as he or she falls back to twist the opponent into the mat.

This variation of vertical suplex sees the attacking wrestler lift the opponent as in a normal vertical suplex, but then simply toss them across the mat instead of falling backwards with them. Also known as a half-hatch suplex. It is performed in similar fashion to a snap suplex. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up while bridging backwards, bringing the opponent overhead and onto their back. This can be performed with or without a pinning combination in which the wrestler bridges their back and legs to hold the opponent's shoulders against the mat.

It can also be done with a kick for an added snap effect. Andre the Giant popularized this move during his wrestling career in the late 80's. In these variants, the attacker stands behind his opponent and applies a hold before falling backwards, dropping the opponent on his or her upper back. The most common belly-to-back variants are the German suplex and the back suplex. The name of this move is sometimes shortened to back suplex.

For the belly-to-back suplex, the wrestler stands behind his opponent and puts his head under the arm of the opponent. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up grabbing the waist and thigh of the opponent, so the opponent is on the attacker's shoulder. The attacker finally falls backwards, dropping the opponent flat on his back.

The backdrop name is also used in the western world, usually by people who follow Japanese wrestling , although they sometimes use the name Greco-Roman backdrop. However, this move is not to be confused with a back body drop. Some wrestlers perform the back suplex into a bridging position, simultaneously arching their own back and legs to elevate themselves, gaining leverage and pinning their opponent.

Since the wrestler taking the move is falling backwards, the potential for injury is significant if it is not performed properly.

Japanese wrestling legend Mitsuharu Misawa suffered a spinal injury which triggered a fatal cardiac arrest during his last match in after Akitoshi Saito gave him the belly to back suplex.

Also known as a backdrop driver, the attacking wrestler stands behind his opponent and puts his head under the arm of the opponent. He then lifts the opponent up using both of his arms wrapped around the torso of the opponent. The attacker finally falls backwards to drive the opponent to the mat on their neck and shoulders.

Sometimes referred to as a leg lift back suplex or leg lift backdrop, it is applied just as a back suplex would be, except that the wrestler wraps only the near arm or no arm around the torso of their opponent. With the free arm s , the wrestler then hoists their opponent's knees or thighs and throws them backwards in that manner.

A bridging variation is popularly known as the Regal-Plex due to William Regal 's naming of the move. Kevin Steen also uses a swinging variation of the move. The attacker places the opponent in a cobra clutch hold. They then proceed to lift the opponent up and fall backwards, driving the opponent to the mat on their head.

Also known as a Millennium Suplex. The wrestler stands behind the opponent. He locks one of the opponent's arms in a chickenwing , and wraps his other arm around the opponent's head.

He then lifts the opponent up and falls backwards, driving the opponent on to the top of their head, down to the mat. This comical move involves the attacking wrestler approaching an opponent from behind, reaching down and grasping his crotch with both forearms, with hands together and facing upwards into his groin, and lifting him overhead into a belly-to-back release suplex. The opponent reacts to both the suplex and being grabbed and lifted by his crotch, to humorous effect.

Female wrestler Candice LeRae is known for this move, which she uses on male opponents, and calls it a Balls-plex. Named for its innovation by Tatsumi "The Dragon" Fujinami. This belly-to-back suplex variation sees the wrestler apply a full nelson and then bridge his back, lifting the opponent over him and onto their shoulders down to the mat.

The wrestler keeps his back arched and the hold applied, pinning the opponent's shoulders down to the mat. The wrestler may also release the opponent mid-arch, throwing them down to the mat shoulders and neck first, in a variation known as release dragon suplex. Also known as an electric chair slam. Manami Toyota innovated a variation in which she executed the same move but with a straight jacket hold applied at the same time.

She called it the Japanese Ocean Cyclone Suplex. Named after Karl Gotch , the move is technically known as a belly-to-back waist lock suplex or a back arch throw, the wrestler stands behind the opponent, grabs them around their waist, lifts them up, and falls backwards while bridging his back and legs, slamming the opponent down to the mat shoulder and upper back first.

The wrestler keeps the waistlock and continues bridging with their back and legs, pinning the opponent's shoulders down against the mat. The regular pinning variation can be referred to as the German suplex pin. The wrestler can also release the opponent in mid arch, which is referred to as a release German suplex.

Sometimes, rather than bridging for a pin, the wrestler may roll himself into another position to perform the move again, often referred to as multiple, rolling, or Non-Release German suplexes, in which the attacking wrestler performs a German suplex, then rolls his legs to get back into a standing position, but does NOT let the opponent go to do so.

The attacking wrestler then repeats this numerous times, most commonly three, but sometimes up to eight or more. The straight jacket suplex or package German suplex has the attacker trapping the opponent's arms while performing a German suplex. Variants such as the cross-arm suplex or X-Plex see the opponent's arms crossed across their chest and held by the attacker.

The wrestler then uses the crossed arms as leverage to aid in lifting the opponent up while falling backwards to throw the opponent as in a German suplex. This is a suplex variation in which the wrestler, while standing behind the opponent, places one arm in a half nelson and the other arm in a chickenwing. The wrestler then proceeds to fall backwards while lifting the opponent overhead in the hold and driving them into the mat behind them. This move is referred to as a half and half suplex as it is a combination of a half nelson suplex and a tiger suplex and is currently performed by Sami Zayn and Oney Lorcan.

This is a version of a German suplex where the attacker stands behind the opponent, facing the same direction. The attacker uses one hand to apply a half nelson hold and wraps the other hand around the opponent's waist.

The attacker then lifts the opponent up and falls backwards, dropping the opponent on their head, neck, or shoulders. Mayumi Ozaki popularized a bridging variation and she called it the Tequila Sunrise. The wrestler stands behind the opponent and bends him forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between his legs and held, while the opponent's other arm is hooked by the attacker maneuvering his arm around in front of the opponent's shoulder as in a pumphandle and securing it behind the head a quarter-nelson.

The attacker then lifts his opponent up over his head and falls backwards to slam the opponent against the mat back-first. There are many variations of the pumphandle suplex, including the maintaining of the grip in order to land the opponent on the mat face-first, or inverting the opponent's body position and securing the opponent's free arm using a half-nelson grip instead of the normal quarter-nelson. The attacker places the opponent in a sleeper hold and then hooks one of the opponents arms with his free arm.

The attacker then lifts the opponent up and falls backwards, driving the opponent on their head. A slight variation sees the attacker apply a half nelson choke instead of the sleeper hold before performing the suplex. The attacker stands behind the opponent, facing the same direction. The wrestler then pass both of his arms under the opponent's arms and puts one arm in a half nelson and the other hand around the neck in front of the opponent, like in a sleeper.

The hand in front of the neck is locked with the other hand at the wrist. With the grip secure, the attacker then lifts the opponent up and falls backwards, dropping the opponent on their head, neck, or shoulders.

Imsges: how do you hook up driving lights

how do you hook up driving lights

Author Robert Hurst discusses how, in America, bicyclists were an afterthought at best when our cities were planned and built, and today are left to navigate through a hard and unsympathetic world that was not made for them--like rats in a sewer. I've been riding in cities mainly Cleveland and Winnipeg for 45 years or so.

how do you hook up driving lights

The wrestler then jumps forward and swings around, but lands on their feet and performs a suplex on their opponent. Retrieved 5 February

how do you hook up driving lights

Suplex tackles in gridiron football are not allowed and may be subject to penalties or even fines. One cyclist tied this bright noodle to the back of his bike, exactly the www.free australian dating sites of his handlebars, to show drivers how much space he takes up on the road. That's why you'll wave to motorists how do you hook up driving lights you think might be about to pull out in front of you, and why you'll how do you hook up driving lights lit up like a Christmas tree at night front and rear lights. This page shows you real ways you can get hit and real ways to avoid them. The most common front facelock suplex is the vertical suplex. On fast roadways with few cross streets and thus less chances to get hit at intersectionsyou'll ride farther to the right. With the free arm sthe wrestler then hoists their opponent's knees or thighs and throws them backwards in that manner.